Posts tagged Vermont
Vermont Breastfeeding Laws
 

Vermont is one of the more breastfeeding-positive states, thanks to state workplace legislation that transcends the protection provided by the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) in both the number of mothers it covers and for how long. Outside of the workplace, breastfeeding laws in Vermont are similar to those in any other state: breastfeeding in public is protected by the law.

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We’ve awarded Vermont three drops on our scale.

 

VT Breastfeeding Laws: In Public

Mothers in Vermont have the right to breastfeed in public. Read the law: Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 9, § 4502 (j) (2002) and 2002 Vt. Acts, Act 117

 

VT Breastfeeding Laws: At Work

Employers are required to support all breastfeeding employees—not just those who are hourly—by providing break time and a space (other than a bathroom) to pump at work for up to three years after the child’s birth (two years longer than the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)). Read the law: Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 21, § 305

Note: Mamava’s goal is to provide the most up-to-date legislative information available. But federal, state, and municipal laws are constantly evolving—which is a good thing! So if we’ve missed something, we appreciate any additions or corrections. Contact us at [email protected]

 

Now that you know the law, what next?

Take action to make breastfeeding better.

 
 
 

Mamava Breastfeeding Laws key

One drop

State law protects breastfeeding in public (now true of all states). There are no state-level workplace breastfeeding laws. Breastfeeding mothers, who are paid hourly, are covered by the federal FLSA. Not the breast-case scenario.

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Two drops

State law provides workplace breastfeeding rights for specific employee sectors (e.g., city employees) OR mandates lactation accommodations for specific locations (e.g., airports, municipal buildings).

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Three drops

State law protects all working breastfeeding moms (not just hourly) and exceeds the federal FLSA law.

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Four drops

State law protects all working breastfeeding mothers AND additional state legislation protects specific populations OR mandates lactation accommodations for specific locations.

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Five drops

The gold standard. State law protects all working breastfeeding mothers, identifies standards for lactation spaces (e.g., access to a refrigerator), AND additional state legislation protects specific populations AND mandates lactation accommodations for specific locations.